Lembata

Fine Crafts Archive Flores Kalimantan Lembata Rote Savu Sumba Timor

Bleto


C-LE-LA-001-Bleto-Large

Long tena boathouses, Lemalera, Lembata.

Long tena boathouses, Lemalera, Lembata.

The people of Lamalera, a small village perched on the southern shore of Lembata, wear these lontar palm hats in the fields or out at sea. Most Lamalerans survive by subsistence fishing, and they hunt whales, sharks, manta rays, and tuna in the rich waters just offshore. The village has about twenty working boats, called tena in the Lamaholot language, each of which can carry about a dozen men to sea. Tena are completely handmade, with ropes and even sails woven from the leaves of the giant gabang palm (Corypha utan). Each crewmember has a firm job assignment: some row, some bail, one steers, and one stands in the bow with a bamboo harpoon. The fishermen use no guns and no motors. These modern accoutrements are beyond the means of most Lamalera villagers, and their use in only one or two boats would upset the harmony of the community.

 

  • Traditional Fisherman`s Hat
  • 2007
  • Lamalera village, Lembata
  • Lontar palm leaf
  • 47 x 23 cm. (18.5 x 9 in)
  • Code # C.LE.LA.001

 

Sidu


C-LE-LA-003-Sidu

Wilhelmus weaving strips of young lontar leaf, Lembata.

Wilhelmus weaving strips of young lontar leaf, Lembata.

The people of Lamalera bail out their handmade fishing boats with these sidubaskets, woven from lontar palm fronds. Large Lamalera fishing boats, called tena, seat about a dozen men, who row, bail, and handle the woven palm-leaf sail. One man stands in the bow with a bamboo harpoon, scanning the waves for sharks, manta rays, and whales. The peoples of eastern Indonesia exploit every part of the lontar palm tree (Borassus flabellifer). Full-grown lontarleaves are plaited into roofs and sleeping mats. Young, un-opened lontar fronds are curved into containers to carry water or collect palm sap, or are woven into hats, bags, and baskets. Sweet, milky lontar sap is an invaluable source of food for some traditional communities, especially during the long dry seasons. The sap can also be boiled down into nutritious syrup or lumps of red-brown sugar.

  • Bailing Basket
  • 2007
  • Made by Melikor Keraf
  • Lamalera village, Lembata
  • Lontar palm leaf
  • Height 17 cm. (7 in)
  • Code # C.LE.LA.003

 

Kelekar


C-LE-LA-004-Kelekar Senedek-Large

Eating from a kelekar lined with banana leaf, Tapobali, Lembata.

Eating from a kelekar lined with banana leaf, Tapobali, Lembata.

The people of Tapobali village scratch a living from the steep, rocky hillsides of southern Lembata. They serve meals of corn, cassava, and sweet potatoes from woven kelekar dishes. The villagers use a wider basket of similar design called a kelekar senedek to winnow the chaff from their dry-field rice. The peoples of eastern Indonesia exploit every part of the lontar palm tree (Borassus flabellifer). Full-grown lontar leaves are plaited into roofs and sleeping mats. Young, un-opened lontar fronds are curved into containers to carry water or collect palm sap, or are woven into hats, bags, and baskets. Sweet, milky lontar sap is an invaluable source of food for some traditional communities, especially during the long dry seasons.
The sap can also be boiled down into nutritious syrup or lumps of red-brown sugar.

  • Basketry Dish
  • 2007
  • Tapobali village, Lembata
  • Lontar palm leaf
  • Width 36 cm. (14 in)
  • Code # C.LE.LA.004

 

Kelekar


C-LE-LA-007-Kelekar-Large

Eating from a kelekar lined with banana leaf, Tapobali, Lembata.

Eating from a kelekar lined with banana leaf, Tapobali, Lembata.

The people of Tapobali village scratch a living from the steep, rocky hillsides of southern Lembata. They serve meals of corn, cassava, and sweet potatoes from woven kelekar dishes. The villagers use a wider basket of similar design called a kelekar senedek to winnow the chaff from their dry-field rice. The peoples of eastern Indonesia exploit every part of the lontar palm tree (Borassus flabellifer). Full-grown lontar leaves are plaited into roofs and sleeping mats. Young, un-opened lontar fronds are curved into containers to carry water or collect palm sap, or are woven into hats, bags, and baskets. Sweet, milky lontar sap is an invaluable source of food for some traditional communities, especially during the long dry seasons. The sap can also be boiled down into nutritious syrup or lumps of red-brown sugar.

  • Basketry Dish
  • 2007
  • Tapobali village, Lembata
  • Lontar palm leaf
  • Width 21 cm. (8.5 in)
  • Code # C.LE.LA.007

 

Sidu Baku


C-LE-LA-008-Sidu Baku.tif

Carrying corn to market, Tapobali, Lembata.

Carrying corn to market, Tapobali, Lembata.

The people of Tapobali village scratch a living from the steep, rocky hillsides of southern Lembata. They carry corn, cassava, and sweet potatoes home from the fields in sidu baku baskets like this one. Both men and women weavesidu baskets in their spare time. The peoples of eastern Indonesia exploit every part of the lontar palm tree (Borassus flabellifer). Full-grown lontarleaves are plaited into roofs and sleeping mats. Young, un-opened lontar fronds are curved into containers to carry water or collect palm sap, or are woven into hats, bags, and baskets. Sweet, milky lontar sap is an invaluable source of food for some traditional communities, especially during the long dry seasons. The sap can also be boiled down into nutritious syrup or lumps of red-brown sugar.

  • Harvest Basket
  • 2007
  • Tapobali village, Lembata
  • Lontar palm leaf
  • Height 35 cm. (14 in)
  • Code # C.LE.LA.008